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PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2006 5:34 pm 
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Where is this residual valve you speak of and does it need to be removed when upgrading the front brakes or only when the rears are swapped over to discs?

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94 Eagle Summit DL coupe
98 Mitsubishi Mirage DE sedan
98 Mitsubishi Mirage DE sedan (project green turd)
15 Mitsubishi Mirage ES hatch


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2006 6:22 pm 
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Sorry for the book, it will help everyone who needs this information too! 8)

The residual valve will only need to be removed when the drums are removed. Balance the system wisely and you should have few problems with proper dynamics installed and functioning within your system; by this I mean that you must upgrade in stages that will allow your system to function so that you do not bias the braking too much to the front or rear, and you maintain the weight transfer, and braking power in sufficient quantity F/R. You can play with this a whole lot and never get it the way you want for daily driving or at the track under certain conditions but you can get it to roughly what the factory deisgned for our cars and be very surprised with what you can now do compared to what the original 1.5L setup was like for most of us.

I would recommend these setups for those that want plug and play with only a bolt in affair to be the most complicated things they have to do:

Upgrading front small solid rotors setup to vented discs:
89-90 sedan caliper brackets (possibly Elantra stuff - cannot remember enough on cross-over :-? )
89-90 calipers
4.0:1 brake booster (with prop valve setup.MC setup) from Colt Turbo, or 1.6 NA setups, 92-95 Elantra <-keep the spacer extenders to use later for pedal setup
...... if you now want to upsize the drums, you are setup for it.
92-95 Elantra drums grab the complete mounting plate to drum setup and bolt it in,
92-95 Elantra residual valve (it should have a different property to it (should be sufficient to keep the amount of drag the way it was designed, but do not quote me on this yet....)

Upgrading to full 92-95 Elantra front brakes:
Use everything listed above and replace the Colt vented discs and caliper setup with the full Elantra pieces (calipers, brackets, discs)
To upgrade the rear, use the full setup from the Elantra, use the residual valve from the Elantra, reuse your parking brake cables if you are going drum to drum upgrade!
Always use the corresponding MC for whatever front setup you are upgrading to, coupled with the added pressure applied from a bigger/stronger brake booster, you are now set to apply the factory designed pressure to those brakes.

If you are now rockin' the COMPLETE Elantra front disc setup, you can now safely say that discs either from an Elantra, or Colt C53a (Turbo) can now be applied to the rear. You have the proper booster pressures, proportioning, and overall balance to make this work within factory tolerances.


Keep in mind that all CSM's and 92-95 Elantras use the SAME front bearings, so there are 100% interchangeable if ordered correctly. Parking brake cables are 100% interchangeable from CSM drum to Elantra drum, so reuse them when staying with drum brakes. Brake metal hard lines may have to be fabbed to fit to the larger drum plate on the rear setups, as the position of the wheel cylinders has risen in relation to the axle stub. When upgrading the Master Cylinder to the Hyundai model, you will need to splice the wires on the bottle for the low fluid light, and you are set to roll. If I have forgotten anything, I apologize as it has been a while since I've gone this in depth for the braking department. I can honestly say that the CSM's should all have the Discs setup front to rear for those in dry climates, and Big front discs and large drums for those in the winter areas, the car handles so much better with good rubber on the ground.

[disclaimer]
I do not want to see anyone get themselves stuck with a car that is "upgraded" but not properly driveable in the braking department; take no chances here! Please! Ask if you are not sure, and if I am not sure or for that matter, others are not sure, then seek the advice of professional brake men who can decipher a fully detailed email showing every spec you are changing from and to. [End disclaimer]


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2006 11:24 am 
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Joined: Sat May 14, 2005 11:15 pm
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Location: Stantonsburg, NC
I haven't forgotten the pics or the writeup guys. Just been working on other projects that make money instead of taking money. :P The Colt has been on the back burner for a few days.

_________________
94 Eagle Summit DL coupe
98 Mitsubishi Mirage DE sedan
98 Mitsubishi Mirage DE sedan (project green turd)
15 Mitsubishi Mirage ES hatch


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 11:39 am 
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OK I finally got around to doing the other side last night and I was able to snap some pics for you guys. I decided to just add them here instead of starting a new thread since there is already a ton of useful information here. For those that haven't been following along this modification allows you to use a larger, vented brake rotor from the 92-95 Hyundai Elantra along with the much larger FWD DSM front brake calipers. This is a serious upgrade over the tiny stock 1.5L brakes. Time to get greasy!

First thing is to jack the car up and get the front wheel off. Now the complete spindle assembly has to come off of the front suspension arm, From memory here are the things that have to come off. Large axle nut and cotter pin, two 17mm bolts/nuts holding the lower strut to the spindle, lower ball joint nut, tie-rod end nut/cotter pin, caliper and caliper bracket. Once all of these are off you will have to hammer the tie-rod end and lower ball joint off because they are pressed on. I used a pickle fork and a heavy hammer. This destroys the rubber dust boots and these parts will have to be replaced. You may be able to be more careful and save them but honestly they probably need to be replaced anyway as these cars are getting old. Here is what the assembly looks like off of the car.

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Once it's off you need to take the 4 bolts/nuts off that hold the rotor to the hub. I used a long extension, 14mm socket, 14mm wrench and my impact gun. Just keep spinning the spindle until you can get to the bolt head. I actually trimmed some of the tin dust shield off to allow more room for this. Tin snips work well for that.

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The next step is to press the hub assembly off of the rotor/spindle. I used 2 thick wood blocks and a 22mm socket to do this.

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The thick wood blocks are used to keep the front of the hub from hitting the press. If done correctly the socket will push everything apart and this is what you will be left with, the spindle, rotor and the front of the hub with it's bearing still pressed on it.

Image

Now it's time to press out the old bearings. Again these could possibly be reused but I would not recommend it. If you do take this chance at least replace the seals at the very least. To get the bearing out of the spindle I took a large 1/2 extension and went around it evenly hitting it with a hammer. Eventually it'll just come out the bottom. Also do this on something sturdy, I just put it on the concrete floor.

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Now it's time to get the other bearing off of the hub. They make special pullers for this but I don't have one yet. It is called a bearing seperator. It mounts behind the bearing and then you can press it out using the press. I chose a different route. I got out the dremel with a cutoff wheel and cut the outside of the bearing off. The part with the little rollers in it. Once I cut through that I pryed it off with a flathead screwdriver, removed all the loose rollers and wiped the grease off the hub.

Image

Now you are left with the steel center of the bearing still pressed on the hub. Break the dremel out again and very carefully cut it a little at a time until you are almost through to the stub part of the hub. Take care not to cut through to this part because you will have to reuse it. Once you think you have cut through enough take the hub and lock it in a vice. I used a small chisel and hit the part I cut a few times. If your cut is deep enough you will see the inner bearing start to move and it will eventually be able to come right off. If you don't understand this part or think you will cut too much go buy the correct tool or take the hub somewhere to get the bearing pressed off.

Now that the old bearings are out it's time to remove their outer races from the spindle. Again put this on a hard surface like the floor and take a chisel and you will see 4 indentions. Put your chisel on the indention and pound on all 4 evenly and you will see the outer race start to move. It helps here to have a buddy hold it from wondering all over the floor while you are knocking the race out. Here is a pic of the indention I am talking about, sorry about it being blurry.

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Here is a pic of the outer races already knocked out.

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Now it's time to press your new bearing onto the hub. First lube the seal and put it on making sure it goes on correctly. Now take the hub assembly over to the press. I used a piston from an old DSM brake caliper as my pressing tool. A very large socket or sturdy piece of pipe will work as well. Also be sure to pack the new bearing with wheel bearing grease. I also chose to put something under the front of the hub. This will keep the press from pressing your lugnut studs out.

Image

Picture of the bearing pressed on. Be sure it goes on evenly and all the way down.



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Next you need to press your new bearings outer races into the spindle. Your old races make excellent pressing tools to get the new ones in. Thanks to pma1123 for that tip. Be sure to press them in the right way also. They have a slight angle on them that is shaped like the bearing. I used a piece of 2 1/2" exhaust tubing along with the old races as pressing tools.

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Race pressed in, again sorry about the blurry pic.

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Now the new 92-95 Elantra rotor can be bolted onto the hub.

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Next, grease the other bearing and slide the hub assembly into the spindle and press the other bearing on. Again be sure to press the bearing in correctly with the small end going toward the spindle. Once this is done lube the other seal and tap it in. I used a 1/4" extension to do this.

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Well the hard part is over. Now it's time to bolt everything back up in the reverse order. Unless you destroyed the ball joint like I did. If so the lower arm will have to be removed from the car and the old one pressed out and new one pressed in. This is pretty simple so I'm not going to go in to detail here. Same thing with the outer tie-rod end. You loosen the hold down nut, screw the old one off and screw the new one on.

Once the spindle is back on the car put your DSM caliper bracket on along with the new brake pads. I just left the stock caliper hanging until now because once you disconnect the brake line brake fluid will leak out. Have your new caliper ready to go on and loosen the brake line, screw it into the DSM caliper and bolt the caliper back on and retighten it with a 17mm wrench. Bleed the system, put your wheel back on and pat yourself on the back for a job well done.

After this modification I noticed that my brake pedal is a little softer than before. This is due to the front calipers being much larger than stock, therefore needing more fluid. I have a set of stainless lines coming in soon that should stiffen the pedal back up a bit. I also plan to upgrade to the much larger brake booster, proportion valve and master cylinder from the 92-95 Hyundai Elantra. This setup will be able to push more fluid also. I will be sure to update as I change something. Hope you guys enjoy!

Image

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Update:
Quote:
I just wanted to add that since I completed the install I have swapped over to the stainless brake lines and the Elantra M/C and prop. valve. This brought my pedal pressure back up to where it was with the stock braking system. The pedal was a little soft with the larger front calipers, stock lines and M/C. I highly reccommend upgrading the M/C and brake lines if anyone else is planning on upgrading their front brakes with the Elantra parts.

_________________
94 Eagle Summit DL coupe
98 Mitsubishi Mirage DE sedan
98 Mitsubishi Mirage DE sedan (project green turd)
15 Mitsubishi Mirage ES hatch


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 11:27 pm 
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Posts: 151
Location: St. Paul / Minnesota
just a little fyi... i bolted on the 92 Mirage Gs, (brand new) rotors and loaded calipers, cost was about $150 and it was a direct bolt on. Only thing i needed extra, aside from rotors, calipers, seals and bearings was the 14" rims and tires.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2006 6:51 pm 
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Location: All over SW Asia
Quote:
Do they rub?
lolol!


With a 41mm offset you can go as wide as 225/50-15 and still lower your car.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 6:53 pm 
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Location: Ottawa, ON, Canada
Update from 89Mirageman:
Quote:
I just wanted to add that since I completed the install I have swapped over to the stainless brake lines and the Elantra M/C and prop. valve. This brought my pedal pressure back up to where it was with the stock braking system. The pedal was a little soft with the larger front calipers, stock lines and M/C. I highly reccommend upgrading the M/C and brake lines if anyone else is planning on upgrading their front brakes with the Elantra parts.


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